All posts by Marilynn Cirri

Early Childhood Education Students Attend One Goal

One Goal Conference representatives for Early Childhood
One Goal Conference representatives for Early Childhood Education with Anne Ryan, College of Education Chair

 

Early Childhood Online Students attend One Goal Conference

On Friday, July 20, 2018, we had the pleasure of hearing from some of our outstanding Early Childhood Education students at the One Goal Conference in Tampa. Representatives included Beverly Kamp, Cher Rosselot and Kimberly Shannon.  All three are T.E.A.C.H scholarship recipients.  The TEACH Scholarship supports future teachers and their mission “to increase diversity in effective teachers in Florida schools by providing professional development and scholarships.”

The Early Childhood students participated in a panel discussion hosted by the Children’s Forum at One Goal. As students living outside Pinellas County, they are completing their degrees fully online. They shared their experiences as early childhood professionals and SPC students. Each student shared their stories of juggling family and work responsibilities while taking courses in the College of Education.  Beverly, Cher and Kimberly expressed their appreciation for the support of Faculty and Faculty Advisors.

Educational Studies and Leadership B.S. degree:

gives you the knowledge and skills to work effectively with early learners (birth to age 4) and their families in both the public and private sectors. Other than some classes that have school-based hours, this program can be completed fully online. This program can be funded through the TEACH Scholarship Program.

Early Childhood A.S. degree:

As an early childhood professional, you play a vital role in the life of a child. From providing a safe learning environment to helping children grow socially, emotionally and educationally, you learn the special skills needed to work with young children. High school students can get a head start by earning credit for early childhood education classes. You can also earn credit if you are certified as a Child Development Associate.

With this A.S. degree, you also earn one of the following Early Childhood certificates:

Anne Ryan, Chair COE, Early Childhood programs
Anne Ryan, Chair COE, Early Childhood programs

 

 

For more information on Early Childhood programs, email ryan.anne@spcollege.edu or roper.pat@spcollege.edu.

Thank you for traveling to Tampa for the One Goal conference and thank you for being wonderful representatives of our SPC Early Childhood Education programs.

 

 

Decoding Essential Foundation for Reading

stock photo of kidsDecoding is an essential reading skill and the foundation of reading instruction. The brain translates print into speech by rapid recognition of letter combinations to sounds.  The brain recognizes patterns.  Phonics is used in teaching this skill.  With phonics you look at the whole word, breaking down to beginning sounds, ending sounds and context clues.  Or you can do the reverse by building from one letter to a word.  Phonics is the code to cracking reading.

Readers Lacking Decoding Skills

Teachers’ view:

  • difficulty matching letters and their sounds
  • guessing at words based on first few letters
  • student doesn’t recognize patterns they have been taught in class

Parents’ view:

  • child gets stuck often and parent ends up telling child words
  • frustrated child not enjoying story as they spend so much time trying to figure out words
Decoding Reading Strategies – there are many for all ages:
  • Write or project it – visually so students “see”.  Example would be air writing.
  • Use phonemic awareness – repeat and speak it.
  • Give time to think about an answer – think aloud.
  • Sort words from a story – locate key words.
  • Follow along – read along and stop to let child fill in what is next.
  • Teach phonics.
  • ABCs – students use a letter of the alphabet for the subject. Exposure to new words.
  • Inference – activity where suitcase filled with objects. Students must describe owner based on clues of what is in suitcase.

Dr. Marie Biggs, reading professor at SPC, came up with a ditty (1995) to sing that she shares with her pre-service teaching students to use in their classes.

I See a Tricky Word

I see a tricky word what can I do?

I see a tricky word what can I do?

I see a tricky word what can I do?

Try a strategy.

Look at the pictures that might help you.

Look at the pictures that might help you.

Look at the pictures that might help you.

Try a strategy.

Use your finger and swoop the word.

Use your finger and swoop the word.

Use your finger and swoop the word.

Try a strategy.

Look at the letters and sound them out.

Look at the letters and sound them out.

Look at the letters and sound them out.

Try a strategy.

Look at the word and chunk it out.

Look at the word and chunk it out.

Look at the word and chunk it out.

Try a strategy.

Skip the word and read to the end.

Skip the word and read to the end.

Skip the word and read to the end.

Try a strategy.

Give yourself a hand for trying so hard.

Give yourself a hand for trying so hard.

Give yourself a hand for trying so hard.

Reading is lots of fun.

Dr. Marie Biggs, College of Education
Dr. Marie Biggs, College of Education

Building on reading concepts in a logical sequence is an essential component of teaching.  In conclusion, developing decoding skills help patterns become recognizable.  Then students they can concentrate on the stories’ essence.

For more info on College of Education Programs, please contact Pat Roper at roper.pat@spcollege.edu or call 727-712-5410.

 

 

Cultural Collections Arrive Fall 2018

College of Education Cultural Collections for a muticultural experience
College of Education Cultural Collections Coming this Fall

The Cultural Collections will be a working assemblage where faculty and COE students can continually add ideas, lessons, and activities to share.  The College of Education recently used funds from a grant for the Elementary Education program to purchase artifacts such as multicultural books, lesson plans, activities, games, music, and more.  Themed collections will be organized this summer.   Students will have the opportunity to use the collections in class.  Thereby learning includes how to make content relevant to diverse learners. Another skilled practiced will be integrating multicultural resources into any grade level or content area curriculum.

College of Education students can continually add ideas, lessons, and activities to share as this will be a working compilation.  Represented through the books and items are grades K-12.  Another focus of the collections is to provide activities involving family engagement.  Including multicultural families in classroom learning increases a student’s likelihood of success.

Developing cultural competence in classroom teachers is critical for student and teacher success.  Culturally competent teachers are better equipped to help diverse students build on their own prior knowledge and scaffold new information.  Multicultural education and culturally responsive teaching falls in the constructivist approach to learning.    Constructivism taps into and triggers the student’s innate curiosity about the world and how things work with a teacher’s guidance.

Cultural Collections Coming this Fall
Jennifer Fernandez, College of Education professor
Jennifer Fernandez, College of Education professor

Current COE students will have the benefits of  the materials in the classroom during practicums and final internship.  We will consider for the future expanding the program to include former students, who will be able to borrow the collections for use in their own classrooms.

According to the Florida Department of Education, there are more than 265,000 English learners in Florida.  Working with English learners and students from diverse cultures is a privilege.  It also entails its own distinctive set of challenges.  Breaking down barriers to cultural competence and creating new perspectives for our preservice teachers is the intent of the COE Cultural Collection.

Keep an eye out for the collection this fall!

For more information on the College of Education programs contact 727-712-5410 or email at roper.pat@spcollege.edu .

Minority Teacher Education Scholarship Supports Teachers

 

Sherri Kent-Roberts, Dr. Linda Hogan, and Dr. Meg Delgato at FFMT Conference in Orlando
Sherri Kent-Roberts, Dr. Linda Hogans, and Dr. Meg Delgato at FFMT Conference in Orlando

Minority Teacher Education Scholarship supports our future teachers.  College of Education Academic Program Coordinator, Sherri Kent-Roberts and COE faculty, Dr. Meg Delgato, attended the Florida Fund Minority Teachers (FFMT) Board of Directors Meeting in Orlando in June.  The Primary Contact for the FFMT scholarships at SPC is Sherri.  SPC COE staff were joined by Dr. Linda Hogans, retired Executive Director of Retention Services.  This was an opportunity for networking with other institutions, sharing issues and possible solutions.

The Mission of the Florida Fund Minority Teachers, is “to increase the diversity of effective teachers in Florida schools by providing scholarship and professional development.”  There are currently 200 scholars from participating institutions in the state of Florida.

FFMT’s primary task supporting teachers:
  • Utilizing Florida’s community colleges as a source
  • Raise awareness of demographics
  • Train future teachers

The FTCE (Florida Teacher Certification Examinations) General Knowledge test assesses a prospective teacher’s reading, writing, language, and math skills. A common issue discussed is the fact that students are finding it difficult to pass the GK to gain entry into Colleges of Education. This contributes to a teacher shortage in Florida.

The Florida Fund Minority Teachers, Inc. (FFMT) emerged in 1996 to counteract the trends related to minorities entering the teacher profession in Florida. FFMT biannually awards the Minority Teacher Education Scholarship (MTES) to minority students wishing to become teachers in Florida’s public school system.

Emphasizing the Financial Awards:
  • The annual amount of the MTES is $4,000.
  • Disbursed in $2,000 increments during the fall and spring semesters only.

 

Finally, the deadline to apply for the scholarship for fall 2018 is July 1st.
For more information, please go to ffmt.org or contact
Sherri Kent-Roberts at 727-341-4659 /  email

Graduate Accolades from College of Ed

Graduate Accolades from the College of Education to:

Martinique Kelty graduated from SPC in spring 2015. In fall 2017 Martinique graduated USF with a Masters in Exceptional Student Education and an Infant Family Health Certification.  She is currently an ESE Support Facilitator at Azalea Middle School.

Martinique Kelty, Master's grad in Exceptional Student Ed from USF
Martinique Kelty, Master’s grad in Exceptional Student Ed from USF
Accolades from Council for Exceptional Children to:

The Council for Exceptional Children Suncoast Chapter 176 recently announced its 2018 Exceptional Student Education awards.  Matthew Clarke, won the ESE Rookie Teacher of the Year, Boca Ciega High.

Matthew Clarke, ESE Rookie Teacher of the Year, Boca Ciega
Matthew Clarke, ESE Rookie Teacher of the Year, Boca Ciega

Matthew is an SPC graduate who teaches READING 180 classes at Boca Ciega High School. His goal is to increase students’ reading proficiency, comprehension, and fluency.  He uses Whole Group Instruction before breaking off into small groups of students — working on the Computer Stations, receiving Small Group Instruction, and encourages Independent Reading.

The Florida Fund for Minority Teacher (FFMT) Scholarship provided Matthew with a terrific funding source while at SPC.  If eligible, full time prospective educators can receive up to $4000 per year. Matthew utilized this scholarship.  *More info below.

 

The Council for Exceptional Children awarded Jenni Herman, Inclusion Teacher of the Year, Pinellas Central Elementary.  Jenni was also named the Outstanding Educator Fan Favorite Award. This award is voted on by students, parents and the community on the

Jenni Herman, Inclusion Teacher of the Year from Pinellas Central Elementary
Jenni Herman, Inclusion Teacher of the Year from Pinellas Central Elementary

Education Foundation’s Facebook page.  As the Fan Favorite, Jenni will receive special recognition and the opportunity to throw out the first pitch at Education Night with the Rays at Tropicana Field and a personalized Rays jersey. She will receive a Keg A Que from Clearwater Gas System, Mahaffey Theater tickets courtesy of the Bill Edwards Foundation for the Arts, a two-night stay at the Hotel Indigo, and other gifts.

 

Graduate Accolades:

Graduate Accolades to Dawn (Long) Lewis who is the Assistant Principal at Campbell Park Elementary.  She graduated from Seminole High and received her Bachelor’s degree in Elementary Education at St. Petersburg College and continued on to the University of

Dawn Lewis Asst. Principal at Campbell Park Elementary
Dawn Lewis Asst. Principal at Campbell Park Elementary

South Florida where she received Masters’ degrees in both Reading and Educational Leadership.  Mrs. Lewis’s personal goal is that every child will be academically challenged and will have the skills to make good life choices.

 

STEM Accolades go to:

Donnika Jones is currently the Assistant Principal at Melrose Elementary.   Ms. Jones won the 2012 Space Foundation Dr. Catherine Pedretty Space Scholarship for Teachers.  The scholarship paid for Ms. Jones to travel to Colorado Springs  and participate

Assistant Principal Donnika Jones at Melrose Elementary
Assistant Principal Donnika Jones, STEM

in one of the Space Foundation’s Space across the Curriculum courses. Courses were designed to help teachers use space themes in their classrooms.  The theme improves student performance in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), as well as other subject areas.

Congrats to all who graduated from SPC’s College of Education programs and your accomplishments!
For more information on the College of Education and the opportunities available, please call 727-712-5410 or email.
*The priority deadline for Fall 2018 Florida Minority Teachers Scholarship is July 1.   Contact Sherri Kent-Roberts at 727-341-4659 for more information or visit their website.
 

 

Educational Sign Language Interpreting – New Track Fall 2018

Educational Sign Language Interpreting is the new track the College of Education will be offering under our Educational Studies & Community Leadership degree.

Educational Sign Language Interpreting now offered at SPC
Educational Sign Language Interpreting now offered at SPC

The purpose of the Educational Sign Language Interpreting concentration is to provide a unique undergrad education experience designed to meet the needs of individuals who want to work in a K-12 setting with deaf or hard of hearing students.  Students will complete the Educational Interpreter Performance Assessment (EIPA) as well as the National Interpreter Certification (NIC) exam upon graduation. Our program track provides students with sign language skills, an understanding of Deaf Education, knowledge of the interpreter’s role in the classroom, and skill development to prepare students to get started in the profession of sign language interpreting in a K-12 setting.

There is an increasing need for more sign language interpreters, particularly in educational settings.  The individual who chooses this occupation must be willing  to accept a variety of roles and responsibilities.  Primarily the role is successful communication, but graduates will have training to best prepare for encountering students from different family structures, socioeconomic levels, and multicultural backgrounds.

Program Benefits:
  • One of the most well respected Sign Language training programs in the U.S.
  • SPC instructors are certified by ASLTA and/or RID
  • A bachelor’s degree that can provide the foundation for those who wish to pursue national certification
  • A nicely organized, set sequence of courses
  • Internship in the educational interpreting field

 

Program Admission:
  • Minimum 2.0 GPA
  • AA Degree
  • Basic American Sign Language with Lab – ASL 1140C
  • Intermediate American Sign Language with Lab – ASL 1150C
  • Advanced American Sign Language with Lab – ASL 1160C
  • American Sign Language IV with Lab – ASL 2210C
  • Structure of American Sign Language – ASL 1300
  • Introduction to Deaf Culture – ASL 1510
For more information:     

Professor Michael Poulin,  College of Education, poulin.michael@spcollege.edu
Phone: 727-791-2788

Dr. Beth Carlson (Lead Faculty), carlson.beth@spcollege.edu,
Phone:  727-791-2746

Advisors: 

Kelliann Ganoo, Seminole Campus, ganoo.kelliann@swspcollege.edu.edu,

Phone:  727-344-8058

Dominick Ingargiola, Clearwater Campus, ingargiola.dominick@spcollege.edu,

Phone: 727-791-2540

Subject Area Exam (SAE) Content Area Additions

Dr. Nancy Watkins, COE professor
Dr. Nancy Watkins, College of Education

For College of Education students facing the Subject Area Exam (SAE), studying for all areas can seem like a daunting task.   Certified teachers in the state of Florida are required to pass a series of three tests. One, the Subject Area Exam is designed to test for knowledge of subject matter.

However, since the addition of content area classes, students are learning about the domain of knowledge in World History, U.S History, Geography, Government and Economics through interactive and project-based learning.  This includes drama, the arts, DBQ’s (document based questions), academic gaming (Cranium CoRE), using primary sources and more.   As future teachers, they realize just memorizing facts for the Subject Area Exam is only surface learning and will be forgotten by the time they are teaching in a classroom.

“If a student asks me where a country is located, I want to be able to point to a map and show him/her”.  2017 Spring COE student

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Students acting out the sad life of Thomas Paine and the impact his pamphlet “Common Sense” had on the American Colonists before the Revolutionary War.

Students in Spring 2018 working on synthesizing historical knowledge into banners and interactive notebooks.
Students in Spring 2018 working on synthesizing historical knowledge into banners and interactive notebooks.

 

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COE students Brenna and Emily practice using Morse code while studying the dramatic impact this invention and the telegraph had on the Civil War.

“Lincoln instinctively discerned the transformational nature of the new technology and applied its dots and dashes as an essential tool for winning the Civil War.”  -Tom Wheeler, “Mr. Lincoln’s T-Mails”. 
 Student comments: 

-Feeling so happy I had this class right before my Subject Area Exam.  So much of what we did in class was on the exam and I nailed it!!

-I feel confident taking the SAE in Social Studies now that I have taken this class.  I learned so much and had so much fun.

-This course is an excellent preparation for the Subject Area Exam.

For more information on the College of Education degrees and Areas of Study, email roper.pat@spcollege.edu or call 727-712-5410.

Early Childhood Literacy, Community Fun

Rothman Early Childhood Literacy
Rothman Early Childhood Literacy Awards
Rothman Supports Early Childhood Literacy in Our Community

First of all,  Rothman Family Foundation is a huge supporter of Early Childhood literacy in Pinellas County.  Improving literacy among the community’s youngest scholars is one of Rothman’s commitments.  Sets of books and mini child size bookbags for completing their coursework in Early Childhood development was the perk to SPC students.   Licensed childcare centers or home care centers currently employ each of these students.   Closing the achievement gap and promoting life-long learning – go Rothman and Early Childhood students!

 

Storybrook Village and 5K Run Benefits Early Childhood
COE student helping with Early Childhood Storybook Village and 5K event
COE student helping with Early Childhood Storybook Village and 5K event

In addition, on Saturday, April 14th, SPC participated in the annual 5K Run and Storybook Village.  This was held in St Petersburg and coordinated by the Pinellas Early Learning Coalition.  Storybook Village community childcare providers brought to life the fairy tales presented after the race.  Boyd Hill Nature Preserve was a great place to host the over 200  to partake in the day of community fun.

 

You could support early learning and literacy by participating in the following:

  • enjoy reading activities
  • games for all
  • parent resources available
  • entertainment activities and more.

 

Anne Ryan, Early Childhood at SPC
Anne Ryan, Early Childhood at SPC

 

COE faculty and students helped children create personalized bookmarks.  The bookmarks were to use in their favorite tales.  Most importantly, all proceeds from the event went towards Coalition programs that serve the children of Pinellas County, our community.

 

 

 

Our Bachelor of Science in Educational Studies and Community Leadership Preschool Specialization gives you the knowledge and skills to work effectively with early learners (birth to age 4) and their families in both the public and private sectors.  This is a fully online program except for classes that have school-based hours. If qualified, this program can be funded through the TEACH Scholarship Program.

Early Childhood A.S. Degree – As an early childhood professional, you play a vital role in the life of a child. At SPC you will learn how to provide a safe learning environment to help children grow socially, emotionally and educationally.  Come learn the special skills needed to work with young children!

For more information about Early Childhood Programs:  contact ryan.anne@spcollege.edu

Elite Educator Program – Be More. Be Elite. Teach.

Become an Elite Educator

Teachers are dedicated, to say the least. They work long hours, spend their own limited resources to innovate curriculum, and do everything they can to make sure their classrooms are safe and welcoming for students.  What keeps them motivated? What fuels their passion for teaching?  Becoming more.

“To help students learn to think for themselves.”

“I enjoy the collaboration with other professionals, and the creativity needed to consider needs of different types of learners.”

“Being a child’s advocate and helping him/her realize his/her own potential is my greatest joy in teaching!”

Be More. Be an Elite Educator.
Michelle Feo, Elite Educator at State Capitol learning about legislative process
Michelle Feo, Elite Educator at State Capitol

Michelle Feo is in the SPC College of Education’s Elite Educator Program.  This is a partnership with SPC and Pinellas County Schools.  It prepares students to teach K-6 with an ESOL and Reading Endorsement.  Students are admitted as cohorts and take their classes together. A mentor is assigned for the entire program to help make an important connection.

Michelle is working on her Elementary Ed Bachelor’s Degree. Most noteworthy, she was chosen to go to Tallahassee with select SPC students to learn about the legislative process.  “This trip was for me to meet some of the people that will make the laws and standards that I will have to adhere to throughout my career,” she said.

Elite Educator benefits
  • Receive exceptional math and science preparation
  • Be prepared to work with Exceptional students and English Language learners
  • Earn a guaranteed position with Pinellas County Schools if you complete the program

Learn about our new Elite Educator Program – B.S. Elementary Education

a partnership between SPC and Pinellas County Schools

Build the foundation for your career in elementary education. Receive a paid internship and teaching job with Pinellas County Schools upon successful completion.
Elite Educator Program Information Session on May 2
Pat Roper instrumental in Elite Program
Pat Roper instrumental in Elite Program

Join SPC faculty and staff on May 2  to learn about our Elite Educator Program, a partnership between SPC and Pinellas County Schools. You can earn a B.S. in Elementary Education, a paid internship and a teaching job with Pinellas County Schools upon successful completion.

Pam Wilkins, COE Academic Program Coordinator
Pam Wilkins, COE Academic Program Coordinator

Sensory Experience in Diverse Populations Class

 

Students on the Seminole campus recently experienced a unique active learning situation in a Diverse Populations classroom setting of Dr. Jennifer Lechner.  A sensory experience affects a human’s senses: sound, sight, touch, smell and taste.  To help navigate different areas of the campus each visually impaired student was paired with another student for safety.

Students participated in a sensory deprivation activity by using earplugs for simulating a hearing impairment.  The use of blindfolds simulated  visually impaired.  Students were exposed to the frustrations of someone who is hearing impaired and experienced how isolating this could be in conversations.  Eating lunch forced students to do more hands onto prepare what they would eat.

Sensory Experience Provides New Perspective

After the exercise, they had a new appreciation for navigating a public bathroom, using an elevator, a computer and even eating food. One take-away the students discovered was that they could leave the classroom and escape the disability; whereas, those who have a hearing or visual impairment never get a reprieve.

Blindfolds simulate what students go through to eat lunch in Diverse Pops class
Blindfolds simulate what students go through to eat lunch in Diverse Populations class

Student responses supported this as a valuable and exciting learning experience. Although it is impossible to gain a complete understanding of what being the blind or deaf world is like, process simulation activities, at the very least, make learning concrete and help students to be receptive and empathetic by contributing to a better understanding of the problems and feelings that occur.

Through these simulation sensory experiences:
  • students were able to identify stereotypes and myths they held
  • learn basic facts about disability, and
  • form realistic perspectives on how people with disabilities are treated
For more information on College of Education programs call 727-712-5410 or email roper.pat@spcollege.edu
Diverse Pops Sensory Experiences at Seminole Campus with hearing impaired
Diverse Pops Sensory Experiences at Seminole Campus