African American History Month Heroes – Business

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Tarpon Springs Campus students created a display of heroes who are not often listed during the celebration of African American History Month. The display will be in the Library/Learning Center in the campus’ FA building through the end of February.

This blog post was written by Alex Johnson, one of the students who helped create the Tarpon Springs Campus display of African American History Month heroes. Ethan Hart, Associate Director of Learning Resources at the Tarpon Springs Campus, worked with students to develop this project.

Stephen Smith, James Forten, Benjamin Singleton, and Clara Brown are among African American History Month heroes whose work has impacted the field of business.

Stephen Smith

Portrait Photo of Stephen Smith for African American History Month
Stephen Smith

Stephen Smith is a sports television personality, radio host, journalist, and actor. He is best known for his role on ESPN First Take. Prior to his morning show hosting and guest appearances, Stephen Smith held several positions during his 16 years with the Philadelphia Inquirer (1994-2010). Smith also spent many years as a reporter with the Winston-Salem Journal, the Greensboro News and Record and the New York Daily News. 

James Forten

Portrait of James Forten for African American History Month
James Forten

James Forten was born a free African American and joined the Continental Navy at the age of 15. He eventually became a wealthy businessman and refused to supply rigging to slave-trade vessels. Forten devoted much of his wealth to abolishing slavery and ensuring the civil rights of African Americans.

 

Benjamin Singleton

Portrait of Benjamin Singleton for African American History Month
Benjamin Singleton

Benjamin Singleton was a businessman best known for his role in establishing African-American settlements in Kansas. Singleton organized a movement of thousands of black colonists, known as Exodusters, to find settlements in Kansas.

Clara Brown

Portrait of Clara Brown for African American History Month
Clara Brown

Last, but not least, Clara Brown saved up the money she earned from working as a cook and then her own laundry service for gold miners headed to Colorado and invested in properties and mines. She was known as “Aunt Clara” for her emotional and financial support to other freed slaves looking to build communities and find work.

 

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