All posts by Ethan Hart

African American History Month Heroes – Social/Behavioral Sciences and Human Services

African American History Month banner for Social and Behavioral

Tarpon Springs Campus students created a display of heroes who are not often listed during the celebration of African American History Month. The display will be in the Library/Learning Center in the campus’ FA building through the end of February.

This blog post was written by Liz Breedlove, one of the students who helped create the Tarpon Springs Campus display of African American History Month heroes. Ethan Hart, Associate Director of Learning Resources at the Tarpon Springs Campus, worked with students to develop this project. 

Daniel Alexander Payne, Timothy Drew, Zenzile Miriam Makeba, and Mildred Loving are among African American History Month heroes whose work influenced the fields of social/behavioral sciences and human services.

Daniel Alexander Payne
Portrait of Daniel Alexander Payne for African American History Month
Daniel Alexander Payne

 

Daniel Alexander Payne was an American bishop, educator, college administrator and author. As a major shaper of the African Methodist Episcopal Church, Payne stressed education and preparation of ministers and introduced more ‘order’ in the church. He was one of the founders of Wilberforce University, located in Ohio.

Timothy Drew
Portrait of Timothy Drew for African American History Month
Timothy Drew

Timothy Drew, known as Noble Drew Ali, was a Moorish American religious leader who founded the Moorish Science Temple of America. Considered a prophet by his followers, Drew founded the Canaanite Temple, the first Moorish-American community in Newark, New Jersey, in 1913. Drew encouraged the use of the term “Moor” rather than “black” in self-identification.

Zenzile Miriam Makeba
Portrait of Zenzile Miriam Makeba for African American History Month
Zenzile Miriam Makeba

 

Zenzile Miriam Makeba, known as Mama Africa, was a South African singer, actress, United Nations ambassador, and civil rights activist. She heavily influenced musical genres including Afropop, jazz, and world music, while bringing African music to a global audience. She was an advocate against apartheid and white-minority government in South Africa.

Mildred Loving
Mildred Loving

Mildred Loving was sentenced to prison after marrying a white man named Richard Loving in 1958. Their marriage violated Virginia’s Integrity Act of 1924, which prohibited marriage between people classified as “white” and people classified as “colored.” In 1963, Loving wrote to then Attorney General Robert Kennedy for guidance. Upon his recommendation, she contacted the ACLU, which took the case all the way to the Supreme Court. With their unanimous decision, the Supreme Court determined that the Integrity Act of 1924 was unconstitutional, overruling Pace v. Alabama and ending all race-based legal restrictions on marriage in the United States.